1. robynwoolston:

    The Canopy Suite commissions are available to view throughout the Summer and into Autumn. Both are the result of a residency with Eden Arts that took place over 10 months during 2012 - 2013 in Cumbria: 

    'Last (Bank)' (2013), Acorn Bank National Trust, Penrith, Cumbria

    Until 3rd November 2013

    http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/acorn-bank/things-to-see-and-do/

    'Watchtree' (2013), Ullswater nr Pooley Bridge, Cumbria

    Until 3rd November 2013

    http://canopyart.co.uk/info/

     
  2. image: Download

    'Watchtree' (2013) is a site-responsive installation on the banks of Ullswater. 
"10 months ago I began a journey with the brief to create ‘artwork in trees’ for Eden Arts, Cumbria. What began as a series of ideas & objects ceremonially hung from branches has stretched to concepts that reflect upon economic and social ‘meta-narratives’. I’ve been both challenged and delighted, saddened and inspired by the history of the region and its innate beauty."
Robyn Woolston. 

The work is available to view until 14th July 2013.
http://www.edenarts.co.uk
http://edenartscanopy.tumblr.com

    'Watchtree' (2013) is a site-responsive installation on the banks of Ullswater. 

    "10 months ago I began a journey with the brief to create ‘artwork in trees’ for Eden Arts, Cumbria. What began as a series of ideas & objects ceremonially hung from branches has stretched to concepts that reflect upon economic and social ‘meta-narratives’. I’ve been both challenged and delighted, saddened and inspired by the history of the region and its innate beauty."

    Robyn Woolston. 

    The work is available to view until 14th July 2013.

    http://www.edenarts.co.uk

    http://edenartscanopy.tumblr.com

     
  3. 'Watchtree' (2013) / 12 aluminium composite signs, grove of trees

    Ullswater, nr Pooley Bridge, Cumbria.

    'Watchtree' (2013) is an art installation sited within the landscape of Cumbria. A grove of trees, some living and some dead, support a series of signs that point outwards towards the surrounding natural features. The words seem familiar yet perhaps forgotten, written in Old Norse, Brythonic, Anglo-Norman & Middle English their meanings can be found in the surrounding mountains, rivers, rocks and language. 


    blaen (summit)

    carreg (rock)

    bekkr (stream)

    dalr (valley / dale)

    fors (waterfall)

    fjallr (mountain / usually large and flat)

    gil (ravine)

    holmr (hill)

    intaka (intake)

    pic (peak)

    tjorn (small lake)

    mont (hill)

    Commissioned by Eden Arts - a development agency working out of Englands biggest and most rural district, Eden in Cumbria. 

     

    http://www.edenarts.co.uk  

     
  4. Another reason I work in a ‘site-responsive’ way…

    Flooded site for the initial ‘Watchtree’ (2013) install plan.

    When I arrived on-site to install last week (18th April) the last thing I expected to see was a marooned tree. The water level of the lake at the moment has been attributed to snow melt and as such has completely engulfed the original installation ‘site’. Despite having visited the location on many different occasions to ‘site-surevy’ during 2012 - 2013 throughout Summer, Autumn, Winter & Spring I was completely surprised by the level. Researching further it seems like we’ve experienced the coldest March since 1962, a climate-change that has affected seed germination, lambing & transport: 

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/research/news/cold-spring-2013 

     
  5. image: Download

    Sneak Preview - Sign manufacture for ‘Watchtree’ (2013) / Cumbria
The moment when you see the manifestation of a work you’ve been developing for over 10 months for Eden Arts:
http://www.edenarts.co.uk
'Blaen' means summit and the image shows one of 12 signs that show Old Norse, Middle English, Anglo Norman and Brythonic words.
Coming soon to Ullswater, nr Pooley Bridge:
http://www.visitcumbria.com/pen/pooley-bridge/
The following link has been produced by Eden Arts to show the Canopy Suite works at Acorn Bank, Penrith ‘Last (Bank)’ 2013 and Ullswater 'Watchtree' 2013 as well as the other partner projects that make up Canopy:
http://canopyart.co.uk/info/?page_id=110
Sign manufacture by Benson Signs:
http://www.benson-signs.co.uk 

    Sneak Preview - Sign manufacture for ‘Watchtree’ (2013) / Cumbria

    The moment when you see the manifestation of a work you’ve been developing for over 10 months for Eden Arts:

    http://www.edenarts.co.uk

    'Blaen' means summit and the image shows one of 12 signs that show Old Norse, Middle English, Anglo Norman and Brythonic words.

    Coming soon to Ullswater, nr Pooley Bridge:

    http://www.visitcumbria.com/pen/pooley-bridge/

    The following link has been produced by Eden Arts to show the Canopy Suite works at Acorn Bank, Penrith ‘Last (Bank)’ 2013 and Ullswater 'Watchtree' 2013 as well as the other partner projects that make up Canopy:

    http://canopyart.co.uk/info/?page_id=110

    Sign manufacture by Benson Signs:

    http://www.benson-signs.co.uk 

     
  6. Canopy Residency Update / March 2013 

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    10 months ago I began a journey with the brief to create ‘artwork in trees’ for Eden Arts, Cumbria. What began as a series of ideas & objects ceremonially hung from branches has stretched to concepts that reflect upon economic and social ‘meta-narratives’ (or the over-arching beliefs that we live our lives by). I’ve been both challenged and delighted, saddened and inspired by the history of the region and it’s innate beauty. I’ve read thousands of words from final reports and first-hand personal accounts surrounding the Foot and Mouth outbreak of 2001. As well as visiting the final resting place of over 450,000 animals at Watchtree Nature Reserve on more than one occasion.  

    You may question what this has to do with ‘artwork in trees’?

    And so you should as I am neither Cumbrian nor from farming stock. From this standpoint all I can offer is the integrity of my journey and intention to understand what connects us to one other. And my answer is that over the past 15 years of arts practice I’ve consistently explored the spaces, materials and places that others shy away from. Whether that’s the waste created by a global manufacturer focused upon product and profit rather than honoring the planet as an equally important ‘partner’ or my autobiographical experience of death after my mothers passing. My raison d’être? To salvage that which is left behind or discarded, both physically and emotionally, so as to understand it’s significance to our culture. And so I return to the tree within the landscape as my abiding companion upon the journey. Both literal and metaphorical. Its role as the Tree of Life, inextricably linked to both the soil and the sky, the weather and the cycle of the seasons. It’s existence is beholden to continual renewal as are we as human beings. Life, death, renewal.

    It is within this crucible that I explore detritus, myth and mortality.

    Our sense of connection to one another is mediated through the cultural platforms that disseminate knowledge from newspapers to Tumblr, literature to art work in trees. Mechanisms such as these have the power to profoundly influence both our ecology and our relationships.   

    "On a primal level, in terms of reflective experience, rites of passage exemplify the narratives that are rightly ‘ours’. They emerge out of our co-existence as animals. Beyond cultural specificity, our births, marriages and deaths symbolise the events we collectively manifest when we commune. These ‘spaces of experience’ are not based upon a neo-liberal system founded upon lack, or an advertising campaign dictated by perceptions of what ‘should be’ but offer a plentiful experience of what binds ‘us’ to one another because of what is." (p30)*

    From geographical differences to emotional cartography. From the stories we share to the animals and land we are guardians of.

    The first installation to grow from this research is currently installed at the National Trust property, Acorn Bank and is titles ‘Last (Bank) 2013:

    http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/acorn-bank/things-to-see-and-do/

    And the final work, ‘Watchtree’ (2013) will be installed next week on the banks of Ullswater near to Pooley Bridge. An artists statement providing more information about the work will be posted as soon as install is complete.

    Notes:

    * AN EXPLORATION OF AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL ART-WORK THAT EXEMPLIFIES A PERSONAL RITE-OF-PASSAGE CONCERNING DEATH. By Robyn Woolston (2011)

    Manchester Institute for Research and Innovation in Art and Design (MIRIAD)

     
  7. Lost language ~ deep roots ~ Cumbria


    Common Brythonic elements:

    *blain (Welsh blaen) - ‘summit’ → blen-

    *cair (Welsh caer) - ‘fort’

    *creic, *carrek (W. creic, carreg) - ‘rock’ → crag

    *din (W. din) - ‘fort’

    *penn (W. pen) - ‘hill’, ‘head’

    Common Old Norse elements:

    á - ‘river’

    bekkr - ‘stream’ → beck

    dalr - ‘valley’ → dale

    fors - ‘waterfall’ → force/foss

    fjallr - ‘mountain’ (usually a large, flat mountain) → fell

    gil - ‘ravine’ → gill, ghyll

    haugr - ‘hill’ → howe

    holmr - ‘island’ → holme

    intaka - ‘intake’

    pic - ‘peak’ → pike

    sætr - ‘shieling’ → side, seat

    tjorn - ‘small lake’ → tarn

    þveit - ‘clearing’ → thwaite

    tún - ‘farm’

    Common Anglo-Norman and Middle English elements:

    grange - ‘farm’ (usually belonging to a monastery)

    great - ‘large’ (denoting the larger of two places)

    ground - (denoting land belonging to a person, divided from monastic lands after the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1536)

    little - (denoting the smaller of two places)

    monk - (referring to land belonging to a monastery, usually Furness Abbey)

    mont - ‘hill’

     
  8. 'The Lowest Trees have Tops'

    'Trees, historically, have been a challenge to humankind. They are monumental, long-lived, stubborn, territorially ambitious. They don’t fade into the background or live modestly on the peripheries. Trees occupy space.’

    'Beechcombings' by Richard Mabey (p5)

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    'Watchtree' (2013) …coming soon. 

    An installation on the banks of Ullswater.

     
  9. Cumberland & Westmorland paper - Friday 18th February 2011

     
  10. Progress Report: ‘The Canopy Suite’ or 1 in 3

    Ash make up 1 in 3 of the trees within the woodlands and forests we enjoy in the UK. They are currently at risk from a virulent fungal disease named Chalara Fraxinea. 

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    It’s a subject I’ve covered before within this blog as I track it’s journey across the UK. 

    I refer to it within a sculptural form too in a commission for Eden Arts, Cumbria entitled 'Last (Bank)' 2013, Acorn Bank, Penrith, Cumbria:

    http://edenartscanopy.tumblr.com/day/2013/02/22

    and here:

    http://edenartscanopy.tumblr.com/day/2013/02/24

    Read More